2020 Census Partnership and Complete Count Comm

Outreach materials on 2020census.gov

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From the Desk of Ali Ahmad, Associate Director for Communications, Census Bureau:

 

To help U.S. Census Bureau partners, stakeholders and staff engage their communities about the 2020 Census, the Communications Directorate offers outreach materials about the 2020 Census that can be shared with the public and provides resources that explain what partners can do to contribute.

More than 120 materials and resources across languages are now available on the 2020 Census website, with more additions coming later this month. Visit the Outreach Materials page at 2020census.gov/partners to find downloadable handouts, posters, social media posts, toolkits and other resources to support your 2020 Census outreach. Materials can be filtered by language, type and audience and can be used both digitally and in print.

When you visitors the 2020 Census website you can use an interactive version of the 2020 Census questionnaire to explore the questions asked on the census and access translated web pages and guides in 59 languages other than English, as well as resources in large print. Resources for American Sign Language and Braille are coming soon.

Some of the many materials and resources now available include:

Please share these materials with your networks and partners to help raise awareness of the 2020 Census and promote response.

We encourage you to follow the Census Bureau’s social media channels. Please like, share and retweet 2020 Census content with your family and friends.

Census Information for Rental Property Owners

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New from Metropolitan Council
Census Information for Rental Property Owners

Landlords and building managers need to know: How does the Census work? When does it happen? What if an occupied apartment or unit does not receive any Census materials? Who needs to be counted in my apartment building? How can you verify that someone is a Census worker? What might a Census worker ask of a landlord or building manager? Is answering the Census required? Are there privacy issues to consider? Visit here https://metrocouncil.org/Housing/Services/Metro-HRA-Rental-Assistance/Landlords/2020-Census-Information.aspx for answers to all of these Frequently Asked Questions about the coming 2020 Census.

Montana Census 2020

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New from Montana Census & Information Center
Montana Census 2020
Comprehensive site for 2020 communications with state message
Find it here: https://ceic.mt.gov/Census2020

Yolo County California 2020 Census

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New from Yolo County
Yolo County California 2020 Census
Materials that were produced by staff for the 2020 Census effort.
Find it here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1nLs_8XwxbkP2sNsAKK8qTDnpti3PyKlb

California Complete Count Committee website

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New from California State DataCenter
California Complete Count Committee website
The California Complete Count – Census 2020 Office (California Census Office) is coordinating the State’s outreach and communication strategy, which focuses on the hardest-to-count residents. Working through local governments, Tribal Governments, community-based organizations and media, the state is funding work that will complement work being done nationally by the U.S. Census Bureau. California leaders have invested $187.2 million toward a statewide outreach and communication campaign.
Find it here: https://census.ca.gov/

2020 Census: Ways to Engage

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New from Virginia Complete Count Commission
2020 Census: Ways to Engage
The success of the census depends on everyone’s participation. Want to help? To ensure that all of the diverse voices of the Commonwealth are heard and all Virginians are counted, the Office of the Governor is looking for individuals involved in their community to become Virginia Complete Count Census Ambassadors.
Find it here: https://www.commonwealth.virginia.gov/advisory-boards/virginia-complete-count-commission/ways-to-engage/

What Partners CAN AND CANNOT Do to Support Self-Response in the 2020 Census

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This post was contributed by US Census Bureau, Communications Directorate. 
A PDF version of this info sheet is available here.

For the first time, people will be able to respond to the Census online from anywhere, anytime. We already have thousands of partners working to ensure a complete and accurate count, including 2020 Census partners as well as tribal, state and local governments. The use of technology on the 2020 Census provides new opportunities to support people responding to the 2020 Census, including the ability to respond without a Census-provided identification code.

The Census Bureau welcomes this support from our partners, including:

  • Encouraging response to the Census in the mailed or hand-delivered materials from the Census Bureau;
  • Providing secure links to 2020census.gov, where people can easily respond to the 2020 Census;
  • Providing language assistance (e.g., helping a non-English speaking respondent log in to the Internet response questionnaire in the appropriate language);
  • Helping disabled people (e.g., helping a visually-impaired individual dial the appropriate telephone number to provide their responses);
  • Encouraging people to call the 2020 Census phone line to respond in English or in any of the other 12 languages available for self-response;
  • Providing access to computers and tablets at kiosks, conferences, public events, community centers, healthcare facilities, places of worship, shopping areas, and other locations so that people can respond to the Census Bureau Internet Self-Response website on the spot;
  • As always, helping people understand that responding to the 2020 Census is important and safe.

A key principle for the 2020 Census is our obligation to ensure we protect the public’s answers to the census. While we welcome assistance, for security and confidentiality reasons there are several things we do NOT want local partners, or tribal, state and local governments, to do.

No one other than Census Bureau employees should go door-to-door to collect information for the 2020 Census. Doing so could create confusion for households that have already responded or those who must be interviewed by census takers because they have not yet responded to the census. Although the majority of our census enumerators will be in the field beginning in May for the Non-Response Follow-Up operation, we will have enumerators working on a variety of operations throughout the entire self-response period.

Door-to-door canvassing may actually discourage response because it elevates concerns by residents of a potential scam, intrusion or other nefarious activity. A key component of our communications effort is to raise awareness of how to identify an official census enumerator. If the public is not sure who is knocking on their door, they will not answer.

We also do NOT want partners to:

  • Encourage anyone to respond to the census on behalf of a household that they are not part of (e.g., it is illegal to fill out a census response for your neighbor’s house, even if you believe they did not respond);
  • Create websites or apps designed to directly collect 2020 Census response data;
  • Collect data over the phone or in person with the intention of submitting to the Census Bureau.

Data collected by census takers employed by the Census Bureau is protected under Title 13 of the US Code. Census employees take an oath to ensure that respondent information is used for statistical purposes only and not for any other reason. Census employees cannot share information with anyone else, including law enforcement – not the FBI, ICE or even local police.